cybermax:

future-punk:

Eruption of Mount Tavurvur

I like the fact that you can see the shockwave go through the clouds.

cybermax:

future-punk:

Eruption of Mount Tavurvur

I like the fact that you can see the shockwave go through the clouds.

(via screwfaced)

angfdz:

me: *has an opinion*

me: *realizes that my opinion is a result of my limited world view*

me: *stays in my lane*

(via allthelittlebeagles)

biodiverseed:


jenniferrpovey:
Oh yes, acacia trees.
They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality.
And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on.
And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows.
Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better.
So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land.
Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc).
This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries.

#legumes #Africa #arid #indigenous

biodiverseed:

jenniferrpovey:

Oh yes, acacia trees.

They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality.

And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on.

And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows.

Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better.

So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land.

Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc).

This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries.

#legumes #Africa #arid #indigenous

(Source: ultrafacts)

Lol pretty sure i shouldn’t be talking to people anyway…

biodiverseed:

dentonsocialists:

From the ISO’s kick-off forum “Why You Should Join the Socialists & Change the World”.

"Starbucks baristas make about $9/hr. If they make 3 drinks for $5 each, they pay for their hour of their labor & supplies. At 5 drinks they pay for themselves & a coworker. At 10 the whole store for an hour. At peak hours they make 2-300 drinks & see none of the profits. Every drink after 3 is theft."

Having been both a Barista and a Waitress, I’m not saying the Baristas don’t deserve to be paid more of the cut…

…but the profit margin here doesn’t account for the folks who are bigger losers in this scenario: do you know what it takes to harvest coffee?

  • Coffee cherries ripen unevenly, so they are hand-picked by workers (often children) making poverty wages and working long days.
  • The cherries are then depulped, fermented, sorted, hulled, dried and packaged: all labour-intensive processes that take a few days.
  • Usually the green coffee is shipped from somewhere in the Global South.
  • On arrival in the Country of consumption, the coffee is then graded, roasted, cupped, and re-packaged
  • It is delivered to a Starbucks, where a minimum-wage worker presses a button that grinds it, and percolates a beverage from it.

The arduous process of making coffee, from tree to table.

Young Mexican girl picking coffee cherries.

Rwandan workers grading ‘beans.’

This is not to mention the people doing the logging, and pulp and paper processing to make disposable cups, the people working on dairy farms, for the milk and cream, or the people harvesting beets or other crops and processing sugar from them. These are the people whose labour creates the goods being consumed.

In light of all this, $5 is actually a perfectly reasonable price for coffee, and there is actually no reason in the modern world that the person working at Starbucks couldn’t have a machine doing their job, and doing it better. Baristas don’t really create anything of value.

Briggo Coffee Haus: it does everything a Barista can, except be told to smile.

We preserve these essentially redundant, poorly paid, and low-satisfaction jobs, build labour movements around them, and demand higher wages for them in wealthier countries, all while the people doing extremely strenuous agricultural labour don’t see more than a few cents of that $5. Cut out the Barista entirely (it’s not like it’s the world’s most fulfilling occupation), and then apply these sort of profit margin analytics to workers in the Global South: then maybe we have a coherent worker’s rights politic.

#coffee #food politics

nevver:

A Perfect Day for Bananafish, Corey Arnold

"The uneasy suspicion that if you heard yourself talking, you would sound like an asshole."

Magnificent Ruin (via nevver)

(via nevver)

moonfaceofficial:

I am slow.
If I was fast, here’s what I would have told you yesterday:
Exclaim! is now streaming the new Moonface EP on their website.
If you’re interested, click away:
http://exclaim.ca/MusicVideo/ClickHear/moonface-city_wrecker_ep_stream
Thanks all, as always

officialheinzdoofenshmirtz:

behold, it is i, the evil social justice warrior, here to ruin your fun by pointing out that you’re being kind of an asshole

(via allthelittlebeagles)

princesswhatevr:

stillstealing:

socialjusticekoolaid:

Today in Solidarity: Protesters gather in Oakland against the Urban Shield conference and police militarization

Ever wonder where cities get all their fancy ideas on how to militarize their police force? It’s not just from the Pentagon— it’s conferences like Urban Shield, that highlight the latest in tactical equipment and practices for suppressing the very people you’re sworn to serve. #staywoke #whodoyouprotect #whodoyouserve 

oakland no..

This procession marched down the street in front of my work and we all stood and watched them peacefully go.

The cops followed them on motorcycles, cop cars, vans and the flatbed they hold the additional people who get arrested.

This shit is happening right before our eyes.

(via absurdiverum)